Best chicken nesting boxes

They were already a cool family.
The homeschool family with six kids was everyone’s favorite. They were the favorite location for Suzuki piano recitals. They’re back yard deck that served as a platform was perfect for Suzuki violin recital’s as well. The fact that they had a large tire swing hanging from the rope of an enormous tree in the backyard added to their popularity as well.
When this family of piano and violin playing homeschool kids added a chicken coop to the backyard, however, they moved themselves up to a whole different level. The opportunity for city kids to go out back and help collect eggs was unique. So unique, in fact, that the kids who own the chickens could actually use a little Tom Sawyer trick and get their friends to help them clean the coops if they also let those same friends collect a few eggs and even take one or two home for breakfast the next morning.
In a time when the world seems extremely complicated, difficult, and confusing, some families have found ways to make a few things a little more simple. Instead of going to the grocery store and debating the benefits of buying free range chicken and organically raised eggs, they simply take the whole matter into their own hands. By raising chickens themselves, these families control what food they chickens eat, how clean they keep their chicken coops, and the source of the eggs that they eat every morning for breakfast. From making choices about egg saving nest boxes to other types of chicken nesting boxes, families that decide to raise their own layer hens can teach their children a variety of life skills.
Money Does Not Grow on Trees, but It Just Might Grow in Your Own Backyard!
Many families see the decision to raise chickens in their back yard as a way to teach their children about budgeting and other important life skills. Even the decision about the kind of chicken coop to buy or build is a lesson in economics. For instance, the decision about what kind of egg saving nest box is just one example where the children can compare prices and make the best financial decisions.
Once the chicken coop is built, it can them become a small business for the family in addition to serving as way to provide some of your own food for the family. The children can go out to the egg saving nest boxes two or three times a day and collect eggs. Once they have determined how many eggs the family uses in a week they can decide if they have an extra amount that they could sell to neighbors, friends, or family members.
In addition to learning about the economics of raising chickens and selling eggs, raising chickens in the backyard can also teach children about the responsibility of taking care of animals. Keeping the chicken coop clean, feeding the animals on a strict schedule, and watching out for other needs of an animal can teach children responsibility and the importance of staying on a schedule.
Perhaps the most important reason to raising your own chickens that lay the eggs that you eat, however, is the decision to take control over the food that you eat. While some families take the time to plant their own backyard gardens, a growing number of people are also taking control of the eggs that they eat. In a time when Americans are growing increasingly concerned over the antibiotics that are making their way into our food, the decision to raise your own garden and your own chickens is a step toward taking greater control of your food sources.
Do you have a grandparent or other relative grew up on a farm? If so, they may be able to tell you the story of how the eggs tasted fresher, and the chickens were more flavorful. From egg saving nest box choices to making the decision to of how many chickens to have in the first place, a family can learn a lot about life in the process of raising chickens. Are you up for the challenge? Ready for the task?